Sunday, October 22, 2017

Shotover

Gold on the Shotover River. Otago (1)

Nature’s weft and woof
On the loom of the land
With the thread of the river


Saturday, October 21, 2017

Year of the Snake 1


Guess who I saw
Parading down the street
My old friend Mara


Phnom Penh 2013
Chinese New Year ~ Karl

Friday, October 20, 2017

Hubbard Glacier

Hubbard Glacier. Alaska.

Crumbling into the sea
Travels from long time past
An inch at a time… or less


Hubbard Glacier, SE Alaska, largest tidewater glacier in North America, on Disenchantment Bay at head of Yakutat Bay, at the northern end of the Alaskan panhandle. Extending 76 mi (122 km) from Mt. Logan in Yukon, the glacier's face is more than 6 mi (9.6 km) across and some 300 ft (90 m) high. It has twice blocked (1986, 2002) the mouth of Russell Fjord, making it a lake as high as 90 ft (27 m) above sea level. ~ Bernard

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Crested Grebe 2

The Australasian crested grebe.

Enter my mind
See through my eyes
Wear my feathered cap


Australasian Crested Grebe

The Australasian crested grebe is majestic and distinctive diving bird that is usually seen on the southern lakes of New Zealand where it breeds. It has a slender neck, sharp black bill and head with a distinctive black double crest and bright chestnut and black cheek frills, which it uses in its complex and bizarre mating displays. It is unusual for the way it carries its young on its back when swimming. The crested grebe belongs to an ancient order of diving water birds found on every continent in the world. They are rarely seen on land except when they clamber onto their nests on the lakeshore. The Australasian crested grebe occurs in New Zealand and Australia but it is threatened in both countries and the New Zealand population probably numbers fewer than 600 birds. ~ Bernard

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Beach Patrol

Beach patrol Geelong Aust.

Look sharp gents
Danger ever near by
Alert we be


The Geelong Bollards are painted wooden bollards representing over 100 historic Geelong characters, and are one of the main attractions for people visiting Geelong.
Located along the waterfront beaches from Limeburner's Point to Rippleside Park, the 100+ bollards are situated at 48 sites and consist of lifesavers, families, footballers, sailors, town bands, fishermen and more.
Artist Jan Mitchell was commissioned by the City of Greater Geelong in 1995 to transform reclaimed timber pier pylons into these remarkable works of art.
Following the Bollard Trail, you will meet some of the unique characters who played a part in Geelong's history, from the original Indigenous inhabitants to more contemporary characters. ~ Bernard

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Punting on the Avon 2

Punting on the Avon. Christchurch.NZ

Steady as she goes
Dear ladies and gentle ones
Try not to rock the punt


Punting on the Avon River is an iconic Christchurch Attraction not to be missed. Depart from the historic Antigua Boat Shed landing where your Punter will guide you quietly past weeping willows, woodlands and the leafy banks of North Hagley Park along side the Christchurch Botanic Gardens. ~ Bernard

Monday, October 16, 2017

Temple


Our temple seems smaller
More down to earth
In the light of day


Sunday, October 15, 2017

Icy Strait Point

Icy Strait Point Alaska.

Beyond the pier
Clouds glower
Blue mountains get misty


Icy Strait Point is a privately owned tourist destination just outside the small village of Hoonah, Alaska. It is located on Chichagof Island and is named after the nearby Icy Strait. ~ Bernard

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Parekareka

Parekareka, the spotted shag. NZ

An S shaped neck
Depends on point of view
As seen from here


Parekareka, the spotted shag
Compared with typical cormorants, the spotted shag is a light-coloured bird. Its back is brown. Its belly is pale blue-grey (often appearing white), and the white continues up the sides of the neck and face, but the throat and the top of the head are dark blue-green. In the mating season, it has an obvious double crest. There is little sexual dimorphism.

Spotted shags feed at sea, often in substantial flocks, taking its prey from mid-water rather than the bottom. It is likely that pilchard and anchovy are important prey species. ~ Bernard

Friday, October 13, 2017

Bollards

Bollards Geelong Australia

Follow the leader
Lest ye go astray
Off the well trod path


A walk along the Geelong Bollards Trail always results in meeting some interesting characters.
The Geelong Bollards are painted wooden bollards representing over 100 historic Geelong characters, and are one of the main attractions for people visiting Geelong.
Located along the waterfront beaches from Limeburner's Point to Rippleside Park, the 100+ bollards are situated at 48 sites and consist of lifesavers, families, footballers, sailors, town bands, fishermen and more.
Artist Jan Mitchell was commissioned by the City of Greater Geelong in 1995 to transform reclaimed timber pier pylons into these remarkable works of art.
Following the Bollard Trail, you will meet some of the unique characters who played a part in Geelong's history, from the original Indigenous inhabitants to more contemporary characters.
The Waterfront Geelong Bollards Trail is a one-way trail and is best started near the Geelong Botanic Gardens or at Rippleside Park. ~ Bernard

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Jogger

The Jogger.

Run, jog or walk
But move on through
This bosky dell


Jogging is a form of trotting or running at a slow or leisurely pace. The main intention is to increase physical fitness with less stress on the body than from faster running, or to maintain a steady speed for longer periods of time. Performed over long distances, it is a form of aerobic endurance training.
Hagley Park is the largest urban open space in Christchurch, New Zealand, and was created in 1855 by the Provincial Government. ~ Bernard

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Cambodia


Oh, mighty fortress
Keep out the evil
Of them from us


Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Totem Pole

Totem Pole Alaska.

A wooden visage
Knowing and serene
Yet watchful


Totem poles are monumental sculptures carved on poles, posts, or pillars with symbols or figures made from large trees, mostly western red cedar, by indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest coast of North America (northwestern United States and British Columbia). ~ Bernard

Monday, October 9, 2017

Silvereyes

Silvereyes.NZ

An apple a day
A shared meal
Among friends


The silvereye or wax-eye (Zosterops lateralis) is a very small omnivorous passerine bird of the south-west pacific. In Australia and New Zealand its common name is sometimes shortened to white-eye, but this name is more commonly used to refer to all members of the genus Zosterops, or the entire family Zosteropidae.

In New Zealand, the silvereye was first recorded in 1832. It arrived in greater numbers in 1856, and it is assumed that a migrating flock was swept eastwards by a storm. As an apparently self-introduced bird it is protected as a native New Zealand species. Its Māori name, tauhou, means "stranger" or more literally, "new arrival". ~ Bernard

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Bandsmen

The Bandsmen. Geelong Australia

Brass section is ready
For a sterling performance
Tap your baton, Maestro


There are over 100 of these colourful carved and painted timber figures, each representing a person from Geelong’s past. They were crafted by artist Jan Mitchell from the remains of a demolished pier, and are intensely admired by both locals and visitors. ~ Bernard

Saturday, October 7, 2017

Botanic Gardens 4

<Botanic Gardens Christchurch.NZ

We’ve come for a picnic
Bread, cheese and wine
The ducks don’t mind


The Christchurch Botanic Gardens, located in the central city of Christchurch, New Zealand, were founded in 1863 when an English oak was planted to commemorate the solemnization of the marriage of Prince Albert and Princess Alexandra of Denmark.

Curator's House
The Gardens sprawl over an area of 21 hectares and lie adjacent to the loop of the Avon River next to Hagley Park. The Christchurch Botanic Gardens have a variety of collection of exotic and local plants of New Zealand. ~ Bernard

Friday, October 6, 2017

At Night!


Thai birthday cake
As a building all lit up
Blow out the candles


Phnom Penh City ~ Karl

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Hubbard Glacier

Hubbard Glacier Alaska.

The dragon’s snout
Lifted from cold waters
Ready to breath fire


Seventy-five miles long and covering over 1,350 square miles in area, the Hubbard Glacier is the largest tidewater glacier in North America. It is also one of the most impressive, a 300-foot wall of ice rising sheer and jagged from the ocean. It has been thickening and advancing toward the Gulf of Alaska since it was first mapped by the International Boundary Commission in 1895. This is in stark contrast with most glaciers, which have thinned and retreated during the last century. ~ Bernard

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Black Swan Cygnets

Black Swan Cygnets.

A fuzzy pair
Float upon the blue
Mom chaperones nearby


The Australian black swan (Cygnus atratus) is completely black except for the white flight feathers on its wings; the chicks of black swans are light grey. ~ Bernard

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Bollards

One of the many Bollards. Geelong Aust.

Maid of Hygeia
Agent of health
In a sea of illness


The Bollards form a narrative of the people and events associated through history with Geelong, Victoria. The painted figures represent a whole spectrum of local characters from native inhabitants and explorers to opera singers and lifesavers, as well as preserving and highlighting historic events.
The inspiration for the Bollards came from the artist, Jan Mitchell. Work on the Bollards began in 1995 including nearly a year of extensive research with the last of the figures completed in 1999. ~ Bernard

Monday, October 2, 2017

Quietly Flows the Avon

Quitley flows the Avon. Christchurch.

River flows silent
By path and lawn
Trees let go their leaves


The Avon River flows through the centre of the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, and out to an estuary, which it shares with the Heathcote River, the Avon Heathcote Estuary. ~ Bernard

Sunday, October 1, 2017

King Father


The world is atilt
My view is different
From yesterday


Saturday, September 30, 2017

Hubbard Glacier

Hubbard Glacier. Alaska.

Mountains of ice
Off the starboard bow
Shivering as we watch


Hubbard Glacier is a glacier located in eastern Alaska and part of Yukon Canada.

Hubbard Glacier, Alaska squeezes towards Gilbert Point on May 20, 2002 The glacier is close to sealing off Russell Fjord at top from Disenchantment Bay at bottom.

The longest source for Hubbard Glacier originates 122 kilometres (76 mi) from its snout and is located at about 61°00′N 140°09′W, approximately 8 kilometres (5 mi) west of Mount Walsh with an altitude around 11,000 feet (3,400 m). A shorter tributary glacier begins at the easternmost summit on the Mount Logan ridge at about 18,300 feet (5,600 m) at about 60°35′0″N 140°22′40″W.

Before it reaches the sea, Hubbard is joined by the Valerie Glacier to the west, which, through forward surges of its own ice, has contributed to the advance of the ice flow that experts believe will eventually dam the Russell Fjord from Disenchantment Bay waters. ~ Bernard

Friday, September 29, 2017

Pied Stilts

Pied stilts. NZ

Red legged strut
Marching through the waves
Formal attire of course


The pied stilt is a dainty wading bird with, as its name suggests, black-and white-colouration and very long legs. It is common at wetlands and coastal areas throughout New Zealand and may be seen feeding alongside oystercatchers.

Pied stilts tend to be shy of people and fly away, yapping, when approached. ~ Bernard

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Bollards

Bollards Geelong Australia

Mustachioed sportsmen
In their team's colors
Ready to rumble


The Bollards form a narrative of the people and events associated through history with Geelong, Victoria. The painted figures represent a whole spectrum of local characters from native inhabitants and explorers to opera singers and lifesavers, as well as preserving and highlighting historic events.
The inspiration for the Bollards came from the artist, Jan Mitchell. Work on the Bollards began in 1995 including nearly a year of extensive research with the last of the figures completed in 1999. ~ Bernard

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Botanic Gardens 3

Botanical Gardens. Christchurch NZ

As afternoon fades
Squirrels scramble
Chickadees call


Founded in 1863 with the planting of an English oak tree, the Christchurch Botanic Gardens have grown from small beginnings to become a much-loved destination for Cantabrians and visitors alike. Over the years natural wetlands and sand dunes have been transformed into an elegantly cultivated 30 hectare park with more than 10 different gardens framed by mature trees and expansive lawns, which are mostly contained within a loop of the Avon River.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Awesome


Golden arms at prayer
Respect and reverence

White cloth of purity

Phnom Penh Cambodia ~ Karl

Monday, September 25, 2017

Yukon

<The Yukon.

This mighty river
Churns it’s own chasm
Passing beauty on its way


The Yukon is best known for it's role in the Klondike gold rush. In 1896 gold was discovered in Rabbit Creek (later named Bonanza Creek),a small stream feeding the Klondike river which in turn sparked the "Klondike Stampede" of 1897... the last great North American gold rush, and probably the last. Tens of thousands of people flooded the region from Seattle, up the Inside Passage to Skagway, then over the Chilkoot Trail to the headwaters of the Yukon river. At this point the adventurists built wooden rafts and continued their journey about 500 miles down the river to the heart of the Klondike in Dawson City. ~ Bernard

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Bush Robin 6

New Zealand bush robin.

Legs splayed
Ready to dance
Come shake a tail feather


The New Zealand robin or toutouwai (Māori), (Petroica australis), is a sparrow-sized bird found only in New Zealand, where it has the status of a protected endemic species. The birds are sparsely distributed through the South Island and Stewart Island/Rakiura, although the distribution is not continuous. The South Island robin (Petroica australis australis), and the Stewart Island robin (Petroica australis rakiura) are today accepted as subspecies. The species is closely related to the North Island robin (formerly Petroica australis longipes, now considered a distinct species, and also to the extremely rare black robin (Petroica traversi) of the Chatham Islands. ~ Bernard

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Bollards 14

<Bollards Geelong Australia (14)

Strike up the band Gilhooly
Bring music to our ears
And lighten our hearts


The Bollards form a narrative of the people and events associated through history with Geelong, Victoria. The painted figures represent a whole spectrum of local characters from native inhabitants and explorers to opera singers and lifesavers, as well as preserving and highlighting historic events.
The inspiration for the Bollards came from the artist, Jan Mitchell. Work on the Bollards began in 1995 including nearly a year of extensive research with the last of the figures completed in 1999. ~ Bernard

Friday, September 22, 2017

Autumn Christchurch 2

Autumn Christchurch NZ

Colour surrounds the stream
Leaves clutter the paths
Hopping squirrels don’t mind


The Avon follows a meandering course through Christchurch from its source in the outer western suburb of Avonhead through Ilam, Riccarton and Fendalton, then through Hagley Park and the Central Business District

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Autumn Equinox


Summer leaves a warm glow
Fall colours mark the passage
To winter slumbers


Link



"The leaves are beginning to fall -- the Wheel is turning towards winter, a time of rest and reflection. The leaves feed the soil and add nutrients that are used by insects, fungi and bacteria. The trees use their roots to take the nutrients back from the soil. It is an elegant cycle of life, death and re-birth. The leaves provide mulch on the forest floor retaining and absorbing the rain. The mulch provides shelter for living things. The Goddess has provided us with a beautiful visual display of multi-colored leaves. She imparts Her wisdom.


Hoof and horn,
Hoof and horn,

All that dies shall be reborn!"


Photo Credit

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Yukon Suspension Bridge

Yukon Suspension Bridge.

To get from here to there
We trudge the bridge of life
Sometimes in mid air


The Yukon Suspension Bridge is a pedestrian cable suspension bridge located on mile 46.5 on the South Klondike Highway in Northern British Columbia, Canada. It is 200 ft (60.96 metres) long and stretches 57 ft (17.36 metres) over the Tutshi River Canyon. There is an admission charge and it is visited by over 25 000 people every summer between the months of May and September. ~ Bernard

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

New Zealand Dotterel 2

New Zealand Dotterel.

Feel somewhat embarrassed
My performance was poor
I forgot my lines


The New Zealand dotterel is a familiar bird of sandy east coast beaches in the northern North Island, but is sparsely distributed around much of the rest of the country. There are two widely separated subspecies: the northern New Zealand dotterel is more numerous, and breeds around the North Island; the southern New Zealand dotterel was formerly widespread in the South Island, and now breeds only on Stewart Island. Southern New Zealand dotterels are larger, heavier, and darker than northern New Zealand dotterels. ~ Bernard

Monday, September 18, 2017

Bollards

Geelong water front.

By the dock of the bay
A motley crew assembles
No slackers need apply


No visitor to Geelong’s magnificent waterfront precinct can miss the whimsical bollards that stretch from Rippleside to Limeburners Point. Painted by local artist Jan Mitchell, the bollards have become an icon of Geelong, Australia. ~ Bernard

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Campbellii

Magnolia. Campbellii.

A graceful opening
Each petal choreographed
In dramatic ballet


Saturday, September 16, 2017

White Roses


White roses and curtains
Red roofs with gold
No expense spared


Viewing King Father Norodom Sihanouk ~ Karl

Friday, September 15, 2017

Hubbard Glacier 2

Hubbard Glacier Alaska.

Blue ice advances
Down to the sea it comes
To set sail ice ships


Hubbard Glacier, Alaska squeezes towards Gilbert Point on May 20, 2002 The glacier is close to sealing off Russell Fjord at top from Disenchantment Bay at bottom.
The longest source for Hubbard Glacier originates 122 kilometres (76 mi) from its snout and is located at about 61°00′N 140°09′W, approximately 8 kilometres (5 mi) west of Mount Walsh with an altitude around 11,000 feet (3,400 m). A shorter tributary glacier begins at the easternmost summit on the Mount Logan ridge at about 18,300 feet (5,600 m) at about 60°35′0″N 140°22′40″W.
Before it reaches the sea, Hubbard is joined by the Valerie Glacier to the west, which, through forward surges of its own ice, has contributed to the advance of the ice flow that experts believe will eventually dam the Russell Fjord from Disenchantment Bay waters. ~ Bernard

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Kingfisher

Kingfisher.

Had a bit of a cough
Old sock and menthol
Salve an itchy throat


Kingfisher (kōtare)

Our sacred kingfisher or kōtare is a cousin of the kookaburra in Australia. It’s ancestors flew here from Australia around 10,000 years ago. 


Don’t be fooled by the kingfisher’s name, because they don’t just eat fish - they eat skinks, silvereyes, spiders, earthworms, mice and even crabs!  So how does a kōtare eat a crab? The short answer is: with brute force. They have been known to fling their prey against fence-posts, or against tree trunks as can be seen in these pictures* below. After the shell has been broken up, the crab goes ‘down-in-one’ and then the shell is vomited up later. How nifty is that?


The kingfisher chooses a partner, and they stay together for the rest of their lives. When they are ready to start a family they don’t make a nest in the tree – they hammer a hole in a rotten tree trunk, or clay cliff. To make this hollow they will fly at full force with their neck-outstretched at the cliff. Scientists have found that this family of birds has special skulls that allow them to do this! Maybe they should be called hammerheads?

Kōtare can be found throughout New Zealand and live in all different types of country from sheltered coasts, marine harbours to wetlands and open forest country. Kōtare like to perch on telephone wires or on tree tops surveying their hunting ground so if you trying to see them, look up high! ~ Bernard

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Bollards 2

Bollards Geelong Australia (2)

Face painted
Jewelry in place
The night is young


No visitor to Geelong’s magnificent waterfront precinct can miss the whimsical bollards that stretch from Rippleside to Limeburners Point. Painted by local artist Jan Mitchell, the bollards have become an icon of Geelong, Australia. ~ Bernard

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Magnolia Bud

Magnolia bud.

Emerging lipstick
A chemist seeks a way
To emulate your glow


Monday, September 11, 2017

Patriot Day



STONES
A glint in the eye
A rock in the hand
Me against you
Outlander
We've always thrown stones
Be they rocks, words, or bones
Be they arrowheads on wood and feather
Balls from cannons, bullets from guns
Bombs bursting in air
Guided missiles piloted by human hands or not
Yet behind the thrown object
Resides a darkened heart
Separating us from each other
For you are one of them
Whoever "them" may be
And I am one of us
Whichever "us" of the moment
We have not the same gods
Nor drink at the same well
Our mothers knew not the same father
You are heathen unto me
And know not the meaning of love
As I recoil from the vileness of thee
I hurl these words, aimed at your heart
Change your ways or else!
Oh, for tranquil peaceable times
Will we not learn to forgive for forgiveness sake?
To do unto
As if you were I?
You first
Norfolke
September 14, 2001

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Hubbard Glacier

Hubbard Glacier Alaska.

Geologic evidence
In the striations
Of ice and rock


Hubbard Glacier, Alaska squeezes towards Gilbert Point on May 20, 2002 The glacier is close to sealing off Russell Fjord at top from Disenchantment Bay at bottom.
The longest source for Hubbard Glacier originates 122 kilometres (76 mi) from its snout and is located at about 61°00′N 140°09′W, approximately 8 kilometres (5 mi) west of Mount Walsh with an altitude around 11,000 feet (3,400 m). A shorter tributary glacier begins at the easternmost summit on the Mount Logan ridge at about 18,300 feet (5,600 m) at about 60°35′0″N 140°22′40″W.
Before it reaches the sea, Hubbard is joined by the Valerie Glacier to the west, which, through forward surges of its own ice, has contributed to the advance of the ice flow that experts believe will eventually dam the Russell Fjord from Disenchantment Bay waters. ~ Bernard

Saturday, September 9, 2017

New Zealand Dotterel

New Zealand Dotterel.

Pensive, I wait
Everything is ready
Family arrives soon


The New Zealand dotterel is a familiar bird of sandy east coast beaches in the northern North Island, but is sparsely distributed around much of the rest of the country. There are two widely separated subspecies: the northern New Zealand dotterel is more numerous, and breeds around the North Island; the southern New Zealand dotterel was formerly widespread in the South Island, and now breeds only on Stewart Island. Southern New Zealand dotterels are larger, heavier, and darker than northern New Zealand dotterels. ~ Bernard

Friday, September 8, 2017

Bollards 4

Bollards Geelong Australia (4)

The professionals
At whatever the task
We’re dressed for it


No visitor to Geelong’s magnificent waterfront precinct can miss the whimsical bollards that stretch from Rippleside to Limeburners Point. Painted by local artist Jan Mitchell, the bollards have become an icon of Geelong, Australia. ~ Bernard

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Campbellii 10

Magnolia. Campbellii. (10)

Your fuzziness
Like a new born duckling
Emerges from the haze


Wednesday, September 6, 2017

King Guardian


Big feet, strong man
Guardian of the gate
Go no further little man


King Father ~ Karl

Monday, September 4, 2017

Labor Day


Hands and muscle
Toil and sweat
For a job well done


Link

Photo Credit

Waxeyes

Waxeyes at the feeder.

Gathered together
For breakfast
Thanks to the provider


Waxeyes at the feeder.
The silvereye – also known as the wax-eye, or sometimes white eye – is a small and friendly olive green forest bird with white rings around its eyes. ~ Bernard

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Bollards 5

Bollards Geelong Australia (5)

Avast ye lubbers
Rise the mizzin
Belay the anchor


No visitor to Geelong’s magnificent waterfront precinct can miss the whimsical bollards that stretch from Rippleside to Limeburners Point. Painted by local artist Jan Mitchell, the bollards have become an icon of Geelong, Australia. ~ Bernard