Friday, September 30, 2016

Icy Strait Point 37

Icy Strait Point. Hoonah Alaska.

Down to the sea
The brave ones come
Ready to tackle the sea


Hoonah is a Tlingit community on Chichagof Island, located in Alaska's "panhandle" in the southeast region of the state. It is 30 miles west of Juneau, across the Alaskan Inland Passage ~ Bernard

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Bell Bird

Bell bird.(Anthornis melanura),

Flitting here
Flitting there
Jumping up for joy


Bell Bird (Anthornis melanura),
Most New Zealanders can easily recognise the bellbird by its melodious song, which Captain Cook described as sounding ‘like small bells exquisitely tuned’.

Well camouflaged, the bellbird is usually heard before it is seen. Females are dull olive-brown, with a slight blue sheen on the head and a pale yellow cheek stripe. Males are olive green, with a purplish head and black outer wing and tail feathers. ~ Bernard

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Twelve Apostles 20

Twelve Apostles 20

A few apostles left
Crumbling into the sea
Relentless waves


Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Hagley Park 25

Hagley Park New Zealand. (25)

We walk hand in hand
No place to go
No hurry to get here


Monday, September 26, 2016

Framed Buddha


Homage of the animals
To the enlightened one
Teachings for us all


Wat Ounalom Pagoda, Phnom Penh ~ Karl

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Icy Strait Point 36

Icy Strait Point (36)

Hey Mister Ferryman
Ferry me passengers
Daylight come me want go home


Saturday, September 24, 2016

Bush Robin 3

New Zealand Bush Robin

Sweet little bird
With song so bright
Haste not to take flight


New Zealand robins and tomtits resemble British robins, but the two groups are not closely related. The New Zealand species belong to the Australian–New Guinean family Petroicidae.

Robins and tomtits have large heads, short necks, round bodies and an upright stance. They have short bristles around the bill. Robins have long legs, and are larger than tomtits. All are insectivorous. The oldest known bird lived 16 years, but their life expectancy is three years. ~ Bernard

Friday, September 23, 2016

Twelve Apostles 14

Twelve Apostles 14

Strolling the cove
Scurry round the cliff
Adventuring the day


Thursday, September 22, 2016

Autumn Equinox


The birds doth fly
And the fish dew swim
As I go about my chores




How beautifully leaves grow old. 
 How full of light and color are their last days
 - John Burroughs


Autumn Equinox


The painting symbolizes the equal hours of day and night before night gains the upper hand and the days become shorter, hence the moon above the sun. Wiltshire corn figurines indicate the end of harvest when these were traditionally woven from the last stands of corn. As the last of the corn, this material seems to have been believed to contain the ‘spirit of the corn’ and carefully preserved from harvest to harvest. Local toadstools herald autumn and late
dandelions are going to seed while a phantom megalithic avenue extends into twilight on the horizon.

The nearest traditional name for the autumn equinox is Michaelmas. ‘Mabon’ as a feast day name appears to be entirely modern. Alexander Thom has proposed a sixteen month calendar for the Neolithic period in Europe, but by the time of the historical Iron Age the solar year was largely perceived as summer and winter marked by major festivals at Beltane and Samhain.

Autumn Equinox by Ric Kemp
Oil on Canvas - 610x915mm (24"x36")


Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Generations! Stupa


Venerated souls
Heroes of another age
Lest we forget


Preak Auk Pagoda ~ Karl

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Icy Strait Point 35

Icy Strait Point (35)

Ready for business
Produce of the sea for you
We're the middlemen


Monday, September 19, 2016

The Tui

The Tui New Zealand.

Yon barrister
Preparing for court
Wig is in the box


The tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae) is an endemic passerine bird of New Zealand. It is one of the largest members of the diverse honeyeater family. The name tui is from the Māori name tūī and is the species' formal common name. The plural is tui in modern English, or ngā tūī in Māori usage; some speakers still use the '-s' suffix to produce the Anglicised form tuis to indicate plurality, but this practice is becoming less common. The early European colonists called it the parson bird, but, as with many New Zealand birds, the Maori name tui is now the common name and the English term is archaic ~ Bernard

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Twelve Apostles 12

Twelve Apostles 12

Ships of stone
Moored to the land
Waiting to embark


Saturday, September 17, 2016

Massey University

Massey University.

Shy in your beauty
Lush with aroma
Naked in expression


Large blooms of coral/ deep pink with a sweet fragrance. Upright growth and bushy with great healthy foliage. ~ Bernard

Friday, September 16, 2016

Old Stupa


As in ages past
Man builds as now
Surrounding vista changes


Preak Auk Pagoda - old stupa. Beautiful work of art! ~ Karl

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Icy Strait Point 34

Icy Strait Point (34)

In darkened hues
A ghostly trawler
Rises from the deep


Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Dotterel

New Zealand dotterel

Elegantly tailored
In pin stripes
With cravat


The New Zealand Plover, Red-breasted Plover, or New Zealand Dotterel
(Charadrius obscurus) is an endangered species found only in certain areas of New Zealand. ~ Bernard

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Twelve Apostles 7

Twelve Apostles 7

Gorilla enters the sea
Going for a swim
A cloud gentles the sky


Monday, September 12, 2016

Serendipity

Serendipity.

Buttercup yellow
Catches the sun’s rays
Reflects them to us


If you are new to growing roses and wish to grow one without too much effort, than Serendipity is highly recommended to you. Nothing seems to bother it
during the summer and even in autumn when many other roses are not looking the best, Serendipity still looks great. ~ Bernard

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Patriot Day


Reflections of days past
Linger in hallowed memory
Of this eternal now


Photo Credit

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Icy Strait Point 31

Icy Strait Point (31)

Come on ya hear
Come get neighborly
There’s plenty to do


Friday, September 9, 2016

Kakariki

Kakariki, the red-crowned parakeet.(Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae)

Grassy hen
Flamboyant apparel
Dances amid the flowers



Kakariki, the red-crowned parakeet.(Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae)
Käkäriki, meaning ‘small green parrot’ in Mäori, are beautiful forest birds. 

There are five main species of käkäriki:yellow-crowned parakeet, orange-fronted parakeet, red-crowned parakeet, Forbe’s parakeet and Antipodes
Island parakeet. ~ Bernard


Thursday, September 8, 2016

Twelve Apostles Area

Twelve Apostles  area

Roar of the waves
A stone falls
Roar of the waves


Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Burma Star

Burma Star.

Caught at your peak
From bud to petal drop
Exuberant display


“Burma Star” rose named for veterans who fought in the conflict in Burma during WW2 ~ Bernard

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Diamond Island 3


Faces of Buddha
Four outward directions
The pillar is within


Park, Phnom Penh, Cambodia ~ Karl

Monday, September 5, 2016

Labor Day



From cave dweller days
Learning to make and use tools
Creativity builds


Photo Credit

Sunday, September 4, 2016

Bush Robin 2

New Zealand Bush Robin. (Philesturnus 
carunculatus)

Espy a worm?
You early bird
For your nested young


New Zealand Bush Robin. (Philesturnus carunculatus)
New Zealand robins and tomtits resemble British robins, but the two groups are not closely related. The New Zealand species belong to the Australian–New Guinean family Petroicidae.

Robins and tomtits have large heads, short necks, round bodies and an upright stance. They have short bristles around the bill. Robins have long legs, and are larger than tomtits. All are insectivorous. The oldest known bird lived 16 years, but their life expectancy is three years. ~ Bernard

Saturday, September 3, 2016

London Bridge Area

London Bridge Area

The sea rushes in
Scouring the land
Letting go, to do again


Friday, September 2, 2016

Solitaire

Solitaire

With bold appearance
You burst upon the scene
Welcome young lady


Solitaire
Year: 1987
Hybrid Tea Roses
Height: 4ft plus
Every now and again a rose is bred that quickens the pulse and really takes the eye, and this beauty definitely does both. A very statuesque rose with perfectly formed blooms of a lovely yellow and edged with cherry red.
The exquisite large blooms are backed with attractive bronze healthy foliage, and the whole picture is one of pure beauty.
A good healthy rose where the blooms are borne in flushes throughout the season and the repeat cycle is quite rapid.
A must for any rose lover.
Wonderful perfume.

Bred by Sam McGredy in New Zealand this superb rose has won many awards around the world. ~ Bernard

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Diamond Lady


Nurturing mother
Feeds the world
One child at a time